Creatures of habit – Hatuma time again

Date: 17 September 2017
Distance: 21.1km (+11.1km)
Time: 2:25.28 (+1:16)
Previous: 2011, 2014, 2015, 2016

For our fifth running of the Hatuma Lime Half Marathon, we decided to add a few kilometres before the event start to get to 32km. It might be partially psychological, but I like to do a 32km long-run three or four weeks out from a marathon. Luckily the event was on so we only had to add 11kms to make up the distance.

Since we entered for the Tauranga International Marathon (happening on 7 October) ages ago, I’ve been trying to get myself on form, up the kilometres and generally just be half decently prepared. Unfortunately, it hasn’t materialised. By now I would have preferred to be on 70kms/week, but life got in the way and the best we could do was to get up to around 50km weeks, and only for the past month or so. Which brings me to the 50km per week mileage: it is only once I start to run at least 50km per week consistently for a couple of months, that I can actually feel improvement in terms of my fitness. Anything less, and it remains a slog to get through every run.

The weather was yet again atrocious leading up to the event. It was raining consistently, the wind was fairly strong, and Palmerston North even saw some hail the day before – the second time in one week. The weather prediction for the day didn’t look too flash either. But, on the morning of the event, things couldn’t be better. Cheryl joined us for the outing, and by 6:45 we were on our way to Waipukurau. This, if memory serves me well, this is the event we’ve done the most times of all events over the past 16 years. I can’t tell you why. It is just one of those things. Maybe because it is really cheap ($15 and you get a free T-shirt if you enter early)? Maybe because it is familiar? Or maybe we’re just creatures of habit. Who knows.

After registration, we quickly dropped our new Ts in the car, took off some layers, and were off on our 11km “warmup” run with seconds to spare before the walkers (and slow runners) were sent on their way. They started at 8:30. The “speedy” runners officially started at 10:00. I can’t remember it being this way in previous years, but the event now only allows 2:30 to complete the half marathon.

It seems to be the norm these days to have different starting times for fast runners, walkers, slow runners, fast walkers, other runners, the different distances and so on. Which I think is unfortunate. There’s something about a starting line and the masses of people, the chatter, banter and the sense of belonging – the “we are in this together”, no matter how fast or slow your are. With the separate starting times that start-line vibe is slowly dying out.

Our first 11km went by uneventfully. The idea was to take it really slow and just get the distance on our feet. We basically ran to the first water point and back. On the way back we saw all the walkers and early, slow runners. John Stuart was doing his 50th half marathon and a few of the Manawatu Striders members were walking with him for support and camaraderie.

Back to base, we had 14 minutes to take a drink of water, have a pee, and tape a hotspot on my foot before setting off on the half marathon. We were still trying to start the GPS on Gerry’s phone, and make a FB post (don’t ask) as we watched the field of runners disappear out the gate on the first out-and-back stretch in front of the race course. We were way behind everyone else (we could have been the official Tail-end Charles’s!), and it remained that way until about the 10km mark at the second water point. We passed four participants, one of which overtook us again a few kilometres up the road. It was only in the final few kilometres that we passed a few more. And it was only at these rare moments, as well as at the three water points, that we were not by ourselves. For the most part, it was just the two of us on a Sunday long-run.

The last seven kilometres tuned into quite a challenge as it was “virgin” territory again. Since my regular running excursions came to an abrupt halt about a year ago, we haven’t done much more than a few half marathons, and those were few and far between. My legs got that “lack of oxygen and blood flow” numbness/pain and the struggle was on. All I can think was how on earth was I going to get to the finish, let alone through 10km more in three weeks time!

We met up with Cheryl at the finish and saw the Striders gang who was having a wee celebration for John’s 50th half marathon. Prize-giving was short and sweet and unfortunately no lucky spot-prizes for us. Damn – I was looking forward to winning that fertiliser!

[Hip update: it has been nearly nine months since I started my self-help rehab and I can honestly say that my hip is in a much better place than what it was before. My core is getting stronger and I can now manage to spend very long periods of time on a foam roller. My hip mobility is probably the best it has been in 20 years. I’m extremely aware of my body’s movements, tightness, weaknesses and am constantly focused on that aspect of my life. It is literally all-consuming. I’ve spent hours and hours reading articles on hips, all the muscles in that area, ligaments, fascia, and watched endless amounts of videos on YouTube. I’m obsessed about getting to the bottom of it. It’s been proved over and over – running is good for your joints. I just need to sort out the mechanics: mis-alignments, tight spots, and weak spots, before I can really move forward.

We’ve slowly built up our mileage during this time, going from about 20km per week in January to 50km in September. My fitness levels are picking up nicely. Although I’m not where I’ve hoped to be by this time due to lack of proper planning, being scared and uncertain whether I’m doing the right thing (because that is what doctors manage to be good at – instilling fear), but I’m really looking forward to see what is going to happen at the marathon.]

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “Creatures of habit – Hatuma time again

  1. That was a great way to prepare for Tauranga – at least you won’t be too fatigued going into the run – you’d think that we could all get it right by now but I have no idea of how I will go. Look forward to seeing you there.

  2. Pingback: Hatuma Lime half marathon – Jog around the Blog

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